My Confession for Anti-Enlargement Photography

When I first joined the photography industry several years ago there was such a push towards large canvas wall galleries. I admit with all my heart that there is something simply stunning about seeing a large photograph. It can be a show stopper. But as I prepare to move to a new house I must admit that I have several 20×30 enlargements that I’ve been storing in my garage.

Here’s the problem I face:
Our family grows and changes.
And I take “new favorite” pictures.
The pictures therefore become outdated or need to be replaced.
Replacing large canvases or framed images is not only expensive, but most of all, I then live with this gnawing guilt about the images that I retire that collect dust. What do you do with that HUGE image that is no longer on the wall? Heaven forbid that I’d actually get rid of it?!

I photographed a wedding session last summer, and for the first time I actually encouraged the bride to NOT print anything larger than an 11×14. GASP!
My own 20×30 wedding photo that I enlarged is in my cellar now, replaced by more current images of me and my husband that are no larger than 5x7s and 11x14s matted for larger frames.

The benefits of smaller prints:

The smaller size print (11×14 and smaller) allows for economical and easy replacement throughout the years. The wall galleries in my new home will be in my long hallways and have the perfect set up for easy viewing and easy replacing. This of course may not be the perfect solution for everyone, but for a photographers family that is continually adding to the pool of sentimental photos I have of our family, it is what works best for us. And I can happily print new favorites a few times a year and feature them without feeling bad about the growing stack of super size canvases hidden somewhere that are no longer being used.

Here are some great ideas for smaller print galleries you can create in your own home.

ALL EASY ENOUGH TO UPDATE OVER AND OVER AGAIN GUILT FREE:

156bc929e25bc1a15865f35bf8fd8e63

image source

cfe0303493f88a2ccb1a0e6713b96761

image source

b1a5a7b50c6cc4590b09cbdb1e165837

image source

151898b5d529a478b3a3496e1a8af82d

image source

b774325e489523993e595ee0c9d923ee

image source

63be16b697b6db8cba9885b3c9628f02

image source

39d6e14e02efd01197fb1e957abdf104

image source

dfa9ced31f473326738a320c91de8ba7

image source

What is the focal point of your walls?

Admittedly, my focal point art in my home is not photography, it’s oil paintings. I suppose if I didn’t prefer my oils as the main attraction I might still be tempted to simply trade out a mantle photo canvas ever so often with an updated image. But still… what do you do with the old one? Maybe have a graveyard gallery somewhere?? Hang them up in my garage? Or basement?

What do YOU do with retired super enlargements?

biopic2 Brooke Snow is the Professional Photographer for her own family and an Abundant Life Practitioner. She loves tree swings, the month of May, and early morning walks. She lives with her calm husband and adventurous son in Northern Utah. Join her FREE Photo Perspective Photography course for great instruction on easy ways to immediately improve your photos.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below